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Renea Bartlett Pope: an Author That Bets on the Power of Imagination
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Renea Bartlett Pope: an author that bets on the power of imagination

 

Our Director of Student Support Services published her first children’s book: Architect of Dreams. A story about the importance of believing in oneself. 

 

Dream big. That’s the feeling you get when you read Architect of Dreams, a picture book for young readers written by Renea Bartlett Pope, author and educator at Lincoln. The book, published last June, explores “the timeless principle of the power of the imagination and the importance of believing in one's capabilities.”, as the back cover copy of the book details. 

Renea’s story, now available on Amazon, Kindle, Barnes & Noble, and Target, has its core on her personal life. As Director of Student Support Services at Lincoln, and also a mom, Renea got to know some of the struggles of young people when chasing their dreams. 

Architect of Dreams was inspired by my son who was expressing some limiting beliefs at the time about things he can't do or didn't want to attempt.
 

Architect of Dreams

 

Beautifully written and gorgeously illustrated with traditional papercraft, Architect of Dreams is an inspirational book for young readers, encouraging them to learn the timeless principle of the power of the imagination and the importance of believing in one's capabilities. This beautiful picture book will act as a guide for the readers to believe in themselves and team up with others who also recognize and embrace the power of the imagination.

So, who is the author behind such a story? We interviewed Renea to get to know her journey toward the development and publishing of her first book. 

 

DT: Why did you decide to write and publish the book?

RB: I've wanted to be an author since I was a girl, and have never committed to the idea and followed through. While this isn't the first book idea I wanted to write when I was eleven, I decided to just do it because 30+ years is a long time to procrastinate on a dream!
 

I wanted to write a book that reinforced what I truly believe, which is that we each have the capacity to be and do anything we can imagine. 

DT: What was the inspiration for Architect of Dreams

RB: Architect of Dreams was inspired by my son who was expressing some limiting beliefs at the time about things he can't do or didn't want to attempt. I was also reflecting on my years in education and the messages we send, sometimes unintentionally, about each person's potential. I wanted to write a book that reinforced what I truly believe, which is that we each have the capacity to be and do anything we can imagine. I hope to encourage children and adults alike to dream big.

 

DT: Since you published your work, how has it been?

RB: On some level, I procrastinated so long because I was worried about putting myself "out there" as an author and being uncomfortable with how my work might be perceived. But it has been one of the most special experiences of my life. I've received messages of support and encouragement from people around the world and all across the stages of my life. I heard from a pre-school classmate, my high school English teacher, former colleagues, and countless others. The response has been quite touching. 

 

That's what I love to see in learners because curiosity can take you.

 

DT: How has it been for you to be an educator at Lincoln in Argentina?

RB: The last few years have been a reflective time. It is the energy, curiosity, and questions of the students that have kept us grounded and moving forward in this interesting period in history. The best part of my work at Lincoln is that I get to work across elementary, middle, and high schools!
 

DT: As well as researchers, self-navigators, and agents of change, there are communicators at Lincoln and a lot of them write. A tip you would share with our Lincoln writers?

RB: Just get the ideas down. I have a pad of paper and pen by my bedside for those moments of inspiration that wake me up in the night. I can occasionally be seen leaving myself voice notes on the walk to school. When you start on a project and give it time and attention, it all comes together. Often we get ahead of ourselves. For example, I was worried about the publishing process but I didn't have my manuscript complete. There's no need to worry about publishing a book if you haven't written anything yet. Take it step by step.

 

DT: How would you describe a Lincoln learner?

RB: In a word, curious. And that's what I love to see in learners because curiosity can take you. 

More information: Check out Renea’s website. She’s also looking for a local distributor via her U.S. publisher. Contact her!

 

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